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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 584 (some duplicates have been removed)
ministers and members of the arab league discuss the syrian crisis. the lenders in charge of patching up the eurozone have gone head to head in a very public disagreement on the best way to deal with grease. >> at a meeting in brussels, the head of the imf and -- the heads of the imf and eurozone clashed over when greece should reduce its debt. >> but they did at least agree on a few things -- above all the grece could have at least two years to cut deficit. >> it is a question of how much progress greece can realistically be expected to make in a particular amount of time. >> greece's international lenders were playing down their differences the morning after the clash over athens' debts. the imf wants greece to achieve its lower ratio by 2020 while the eu foreign ministers want to allow the country two more years. >> there's no disagreement between the imf and the euro group, but the way forward is difficult. even if we agree on a target date, we have to figure out how to get there. >> the group's help long negotiations of the matter, but the head of the imf remains adamant that greece
between israel and syria known as the golden heights. israel has fired on a syrian army post. it says it was responding to stray fire from fighting between syrian government forces and rebels. israel's seized the golden heights in 1967. the u.n. has been in place on the cease-fire line since. let's get more from golden heights. good to see you. what's going on there today? >> well, so far we've been hearing some pretty heavy exchange of gunfire on the syrian side of the heights. that's the ongoing fighting that's been happeninging at the cease-fire line basically. as far as this sight, the occupied sight, things have been very quiet today. there have been so far no reported incidents of mortar shells falling on the occupied side on the israeli population areas. we did however see some israeli machinery at work along the anti-tank tunnels. these are the tunnels that are built along the buffer zone, along the cease-fire line and they have been, it's really army machinery has been digging deeper into these tunnels in what seems to be an attempt to broaden the tunnels as it were. but as f
and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very important issues taking place today. in fact, this past month has been a lot of can aviate there he is going to touch on. i am the host of idea lounge on coon radio. and i would like to thank the textbook festival for inviting to us be here. [applause] >> thank you. >> just as pint of housekeeping, we're going to be conversing for a half an hour, and then we'd like to invite you to join the discussion because we are live on tv, the microphone is placed over there in the center of the tent, and way'll have 15 minutes for q & a. i know there are a lot more questions than that, and i would like to invite you to go with professor lesch when he does the book-signing and ask more questions there. also, if you could be kind enough to turn off an
shells fired from syrian territory started landing on turkish soil. several civilians have been killed in these incidents and many more wounded. the turkish military has responded in kind, apparently killing syrian soldiers and raising the threat of international escalation. four turks, living inhe bder regions, conditions had become unbearable. >> this is normally where kids play, but not now. there is no one waiting at home for him when he returns from work. his wife and children have left this border town to stay with her parents in the countryside. he packs a few things together before going to visit them. he misses his kids terribly, but the sights and sounds of war were too much for them to bear. >> every night, we would go to bed afraid of the next day the next morning, that fear would go on. would something happen again today? the slightest noise would make my daughter cry and say, "dad, there are more bombs." >> despite with these images may suggest, life here is no longer normal. mortars fired by the syrian army have repeatedly landed in residential areas here close to the bo
the problem that syrians are killing syrians which always divides a huge mountain to provide. >> a lot of people are angry with me because i have called it civil war. but i'm afraid that is what it is. people were angry with me in baghdad when i said the same thing. so yes, it is, it is, it has a lot of what the revolution has but it has also an aspect of civil war. i think that is what is to be said to the security council sill that you have like in any conflict you have circles. the innercircle which is the locals, the region and the international. >> rose: right. >> security council is, has had a lot of difficulty coming together. yet it is probably the easiest ring to start working on. and i'm telling the security council that they have a very, very big responsibility. and they have failed once to agree on a resolution. they should try again and i think they did succeed. >> why do you think they can succeed, because of the position of russia? and china and the position of the other members of the security council. >> you know, i've talked to all of them. and i was pleasantly surpri
is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish priorities you have to begin with an analysis of what the problem is. now, the way the issue of syria has been presented, a ruthless dictator killing his own people. and obligation to prevent that killing by overthrowing the dictator and establishing a democratic government. with all my respect for and affection for the editorial page of the wall street journal, and have great respect and affection, i do not think that is
to "gmt." also on the program -- syrian were plans bomb a rebel-held town on the turkish border, killing six. floods in venice -- heavy rain and wind it wreak havoc in north and central italy. midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington and 8:00 in the evening in beijing where delegates of china's, this party have been deliberating. this week the focus on the world will be on the handful of men about to take their seats at the very top of china's, this party. but what about the other 82 million members. why did people join? do they still believe in communism? from the chinese capital -- interesting times, john. >> they are very interesting times. of course, the focus has been on the very few men at the very top of the party, for good reason. we have heard a lot less from ordinary chinese citizens this week because they have almost no say in the power transition taking place here in beijing. nonetheless, this is all about the party, of course. this is not the changing of the offices of state but the shuffling of key positions at the top of the communist party. in that sense, in th
where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by c
than the figure announced. the dow was up 37. the s&p 500 gained six. nasdaq finished ahead 20. syrian rebels struck a major blow in the heart of the government today killing a top ruling of the party in a car bombing and someone is cutting off internet and cell phone communication in syria in certain areas. both sides pointing fingers at the others. all of this as decision-maker in washington try to make a decision on how involved the u.s. should be. we get the latest tonight from correspondent connor powell in jerusalem. hello, connor. >> forces loyal to bashar assad show a city of aleppo while rebels filed mortars at the damascus international airport causing damage to the runway to force several airlines to cancel their flight. >> the assad regime air superior over the syrian rebels appears to be disappea disappearing. in the past 24 hours they shut down two helicopters. rebels used the antiaircraft guns to shoot down the helicopters in the past. but now they have access to more shoulder-to-air missiles. >> we have shut down mitt-23 jet with this missile from the syrian army. >> bu
a syrian armored vehicle in retaliation. syrian motors fell for a second day on golan heights. the takes may be a spillover from the syrian civil war. >> we'll take whatever action is necessary to put a stop to this. >> israeli soldiers sent out warng shots. israeli forces captured the golan heights from syrian in the 1960, six-day war. a truce has been in place since 1973. >>> iranian military commanders have launched their ever military drills. about 8,000 revolutionary guards and regular army troops are taking part. state run media said fighter pilots are enunteng maneuvers. the attacks are designed to bring down unmanned planes. the drills are intended as warning to any country threatening iran. iranian war planes fire ed on a surveillance drone over the persian gulf. israeli leaders have threatened to launch air strikes against iran's nuclear facilities. >>> afghan officials have had litt success in getting taliban insurgents to lay down their weapons. now they are reaching out to pakistan for help to start peace talks. the government's chief envoy to the taliban met pakistani forei
you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing
. >> the syrian regime steps up its campaign of violence as the oposition struggles to unite. >> argentina is on a roll. citizens of buenos artists discovered the joys of riding a bicycle. >> they have been battling it out for the past 18 months. spent of billions of dollars of their campaigns and the still the polls show that the u.s. presidential election is too close to call. both presidential -- both president obama and his republican challenger on the final stance of the campaign, promising to get the country out of its economic slump. >> the election could come down to a handful of battle-ground states. making final pitches to u.s. voters. >> mitt romney began his last day of campaigning in stamford, florida. in 2008, florida voted for obama. but he hasn't kept his promises, says romney. unemployment and the national debt are higher than ever before. >> one day away from the first day of a new beginning. my conviction of better days are ahead. it is not based on promises or rhetoric. it is based on solid plans and proven results and an unshakable faith in the american people. >> we m
>>> syrian opposition unites. a modern islamic cleric tapes part of a coalition to form a government in exile. syrian opposition groups have been divided by infighting, but they managed to get past the arguing to agree on a new coalition and leader. they hope they can work together to overthrow president assad. they elected the president of the syrian national coalition for opposition and revolutionary forces. he was the imam of a historic mosque in damascus. authorities jailed him several times for criticizing assad. he fled into exile. members of more than 50 opposition groups negotiated for a week. the foreign minimum sters of qatar and turkey took part. they want to get more access to weapons and funding from abroad. >>> israeli military officials say they fired what they called a warning shot into syria. they say they responded after a stray shell landed in the israeli occupied golan heights. a defense official said a shell fired from syria landed near a military post, and the officials say they realize it was a mistake. still, they returned fire with an anti-tank m
with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town that fell to the rebels last week. the hostilities that more refugees streaming across the border. turkish ambulances were standing by to cope. with 120,000 refugees in camps in turkey, acura is concerned about the spill over. the head of neda said the organization stands ready to protect turkey if need be. the turkish foreign minister congratulating the just elected leader of the new unified syrian opposition coalition. turkey and its allies and friends and syria a group of nations that backed the face serious opposition have pledged to give it full recognition and support. we wil
recognizes the syrian national coalition as the sole representative of the syrian people. >> french leaders have been reluctant to provide weapons. they said rebel groups were fragmented. representatives of more than 50 opposition groups formed their coalition in qatar on sunday. six member nations of the council including qatar and sai arab alrea bacd the group. the fighting in syria is forcing more and more people to flee. the united nations high commissioner for refugees says more than 400,000 have crossed borders since the uprising began last year. unhcr staff say people are pouring into turkey, lebanon, and other neighboring countries. they say 2.5 million displaced citizens need humanitarian aid, based on information from the syrian arab red crescent. an tifist says they're having difficulty getting access to food, water, and other necessities. they say the fighting is prevent aid worker from reaching the needy. government and opposition forces have shown little sign of letting up. planes pounded ras al-ain in the northeast on tuesday pushing many toward the turkish border. >>> eurozo
. >> thanks. >> bombed rebel headquarters near the turkish border today, sending hundreds of syrians fleeing. >> warner >> warner: just 25 miles from aleppo, which is being pounded into dust by bashar al assad's air force, the syrian town of afrin is a picturomestic tranquility. but that's because it's being run by a relatively unknown player in syria's civil war: syrian kurds. they fly the banned kurdish flag in a symbol of defiance and pride. the kurds took control of the town after the government's overstretched ground forces withdrew earlier this year. the kurds quickly demolished the regime's jailhouse. but much of life here seems normal: olive groves are being tended, and there's a new school for women, who were denied education before. >> there are three forces in syria: the regime force, the free army force, and we became the third line in this struggle. >> warner: atoof abdo heads the new people's council in afrin. >> every community has its own destiny now, so as a free city, we implementing self-government. >> warner: throughout syria, the people are getting nearer to freedom and
over 400,000 refugees in neighboring countries. 50% of all syrian internally-displaced people and refugees are children. we are increasing our humanitarian assistance as the crisis grows and winter approaches, and our appeals to other members of the international community to give far more relief to u.n. relief efforts have been intensified. our 53.5 million pounds in humanitarian assistance so far includes 9.7 million for the world food program to feed 80,000 people inside syria each month, 4 million pounds to provide shelter and basic relief items, and 9.7 million pounds for medical services and supplies, food parcels, water and sanitation services, distribution of blankets and hygiene kits. in the neighboring countries we've given 10 million pounds to provide shelter, protection, registration and water/sanitation services to refugees, 5 million pounds to the world food program to feed 20,000 people and 6 million pounds to unicef to provide education and trauma support for children and water and sanitation services. in cairo last week i called on other countries to increase
's happening to the syrian people. according to the opposition, a government air strike hit a residential area in south-central aleppo, killing 20 people and wounding dozens more. we blurred the most graphic details in the video, which appears to have been shot moments after the strike. you can see how thick the dust is in the air as men rush to the scene. like other videos posted from syria, cnn can't verify this one's authenticity. one of the first victims the men find is a child, a young boy who appears to be seriously wounded. but he's alive and talking and is asking for help. many children were buried in the rubble. in this next clip, you can see just how powerful the strike was. these were homes, families lived here. we don't know what happened to that little boy. rebel forces fought back at aleppo today and this video purportedly shows the army setting off a bomb. watch this. all of this comes as rebels shot down an aircraft. today, nearly all internet access in syria was shut down according to an outside monitoring group. it's unclear who was behind the outage but for many it raises th
terrible wounds every day. >> nowadays, improvised connex are all that many syrian doctors have. an estimated two-thirds of the hospitals have been damaged in the conflict and many have shut their doors completely. medics from the clinic to drive out to treat the wounded in a private car. the doctors asked reporters not true. other locations. in not to reveal the location. they do not want a government air strike. this conflict has been a crash course in where madison. >> we were not used to these kinds of massive war wounds before. now, after more than a year-and- a-half in practice, we are experts in the field. >> the clinic is largely sponsored by one rebel businessman. more and more like a are cropping up in the north with no shortage of patients to treat. >> next week, germany will decide on their next steps in afghanistan according to the defense minister visiting the war-torn country. >> of germany has nearly 5000 troops stationed in afghanistan as part of the u.s.-led nato coalition. the plan is to pull them out with the next two years. people >> i came here on a direct
five years likely to mean lower prices for consumers. >> 11,000 syrians have fled their country in just the past 24 hours. >> the united nations says it is one of the largest exodus is seen in the recent times and it is adding pressure on the opposition. >> united states and qatar are coming together to bring a body that could serve as a government if assaad falls. >> syrian opposition politicians refused to comment on the conflict or the reported fractures between groups. the u.s. and watar are pushing them to unite. it is seen as key as and sharing for the support from the international community. the syrian national council is reluctant to cede influence. in the past, they have put themselves forward as a mouthpiece for the whole opposition. it is seen as increasingly out of touch with the rebels on the ground within syria. the uprising is being fought by a vastly different religious groups, muslims, liberals, kurds, etc. it reflects the syrian society. one-third of the council members are islamists and they are facing criticisms for not being representative enough. the meeting is ai
the syrian uprising began last year amid hopes that the regime could be toppled. instead, the government is determined to stay in power. and tens of thousands of syrians have paid with their lives. this young boy survived an attack that tore through concrete walls. he was carried away, but not to safety. because he lives in a country at war with itself. yesterday, 11,000 syrians fled their country in one of the biggest exoduses since the fighting began. most crossed into turkey, driven by deadly clashes close to the border in the town ras al-ayn. more than 400,000 syrian refugees are now living in camps. the united nations expects 300,000 more by early next year. and millions of people still inside syria need food and clothing as the winter sets in. but getting them that help in a country torn apart by civil war may be impossible. holly williams, cbs news, london. >> axelrod: later, how economic growth is transforming china. a designer car powered by a surprising design team. and the super pac scorecard. did big money pay off big at the polls? those stories when the cbs evening news cont
's the fighting has been inching closer for months and now the syrian regime is fighting rebels meters away from the border with turkey. there pushing for the creation of a buffer zone and some of the partners are getting ready to help. >> for 45 years, germany was the main beneficiary of nato solidarity. if a member makes a request, we are ready and willing to help. >> that help could take the form of misfiles capable of shooting down warplanes or rockets. the u.s., the netherlands, and germany are the only was with the latest patriot systems. german soldiers could be deployed to the syrian border. they say it is a delicate balancing act. >> to have to carefully consider a responsibility to our nato allies while ensuring in germany does not get drawn into a serious civil war. -- syria and a civil war. >> the german armed forces getting caught up in an intervention in syria, it is simply absurd. this is about a nato member state that may ask for assistance. >> the opposition says parliament must have the final say on any deployment. have not yet decided if they would support such a move. >> we g
." representatives of nations putting the squeeze on the syrian government have met all over the world. their latest gathering brought them here to japan. the delegates worked on their strategy to push president bashar al assad out of office and ultimately end the bloodshed. on one hand, they're strengthening sangings. on the other, they're reaffirming their support for opposition forces. nhk world's akira saheki reports. >> reporter: delegates from more than 60 countries are attending the conference, including representatives from the gulf region and the west. they've met several times before, but this is the first time they've gathered in asia. the japanese government hosted the conference to help broaden the base of international support for sanctions against syria. >> translator: the international community has been asking the syrian government to end the violence. but the assad regime is continuing the fight, ignoring the sacrifices of its people. we need to unify our efforts and put pressure on the syrian government. >> reporter: delegates are trying to do just that. they're working to strengt
long island. more than to 30,000 customers there remain without power this morning. >>> overseas syrian president bashir al assad denies the syrian army is killing syrian people. in an interview with russian tv assad said there's no problem between him and the syrian people. there is no civil war in syria. and the 19 month uprising is the problem of terrorism. he said he's not leaving, i will live and die in syria. >>> an update on that young pakistani girl targeted by the taliban. the british hospital where malala yousufzai is recovering released this video of her. she was shot in the head by the taliban in october for speaking out against militants and call for education for women. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton remembered slain u.s. ambassador to libya chris stevens. she gave an award to stevens sister yesterday. clinton called stevens a fallen hero. designee understood that we will never prevent every act of terrorism or achieve perfect security in this world. and that our diplomats cannot work in bunkers and do their job. that we inevitably must accept a level of risk to pr
news with gene otani. >> interesting, thanks for that, yonggi. syrian opposition leaders say they've struck another blow against military forces. they say a car bombing killed at least 50 soldiers. the attack happened at a military check point in the central province of hama. the british-based syrian observatory for human rights made the announcement. a spokesperson said the free syrian army and other groups likely organized the bombing. state media report two people died, not 50. they've also been covering another car bombing, this one in the capital of damascus. the explosion killed at least 11 people. an anti-government activist told nhk the target was a building used by pro government militia. >>> the syrian military has been intensifying air attacks on opposition strongholds in the north. this video is said to be from the province of idlib. anti-government groups aabout 1100 people have been killed in the past week. >>> the waters of southern japan, plans are hatching to tap an almost limitless source of free electricity from ocean currents. around the world tidal power and t
assault in the syrian civil war. as community gathering places are hit, syrians are moving some activities to clandestine locations. the "newshour" partnered with freelance journalist toby muse on this report. a warning: some images may be disturbing. >> warner: within the walls of a secret school in northwest syria, young students are studying arithmetic, english and arabic. their wide eyes and smiles betray little of the war raging just outside in the streets of their town of al-bab and across their country. question: what does he think when he hears the planes fly overhead? >> ( translated ): i don't have any fear. >> warner: run by teachers who asked to remain anonymous, this classroom was opened just weeks ago in al-bab, a city of 120,000 less than an hour from aleppo, and now ostensibly under control of the rebel forces of the free syrian army, or f.s.a. in f.s.a. areas like these, the syrian government is increasingly turning to air and long-range artillery attacks, hitting not only rebels, but civilian institutions, too. six schools in al-bab were bombed in the last two months, thi
and criticized the syrian government for the internet going dark in that country. but then check this out. our government, our state department, also said that the syrian people will be able to get around the fact that the syrian government turned off the internet and the phones in that country. the u.s. expressing confidence that some syrians will be able to get around this in part because of direct help from us. the government, our government. apparently planned for this eventuality and distributed in syria 2,000 communications kits to the opposition. those kits include apparently computers and phones and cameras, quote, designed to be independent from and able to circumvent the syrian domestic network, precisely for the reason of keeping them safe from regime interruption. the u.s. state department expressing confidence today that those 2,000 kits from our government to the people of syria will be enough to keep the opposition movement going and to keep people in syria in contact with people outside of that country. now, from the other side's perspective, syria's information minister says i
, holly, thank you very much. nearby in the middle east, the syrian dictatorship has been fighting for nearly a year and a half to put down a popular rebellion. 40,000 syrians are dead. it is rare for reporters to get into the battle zone, but our elizabeth palmer managed to make her way to the city of homs, one of the first places to rebel. more than half a million people lived there, but have a look at it now. it now. >> reporter: here's what's left when the battle moves on. just over a year ago, these desolate streets hummed with life. baby amr was a bustling ne babr amr was a bustling neighborhood until suddenly it turned into the epicenter of syria's civil war. armed opposition gunmen against the syrian military machine. after months of ferocious fighting, the syrian army did manage to take back babr amr, but at terrible cost. even now only 5% of the residents have returned and the fight has just moved down the road. but to get to it, we had to take a surreal trip through a fully functioning business district crowded with shoppers and students then down a street. the next fron
with of the cyprian -- syrian war in response. as well as the influences of iran and russia. this is just over an hour. >> thank you very much. you hope their first date is timely. boy did they guess right. i am a news anchor, so if you were not able to catch the headlines this morning on any number of issues, here they are. israel bombarded the gaza strip with more than 180 airstrikes today. the king of jordan has canceled a visit to britain under the protest there. "the new york times" reporting the pentagon says it could take more than 45,000 troops to contain them. i cannot remember a time of more moving parts in the middle east puzzle than right now on this day. so much is new, and they are all inter-connected. hamas is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite s
has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> intel >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> bro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 584 (some duplicates have been removed)